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They Both Die At The End – Adam Silvera

Wow. This one will just destroy you. Imagine an experience so intense, a book where you know the outcome is fatal to both characters, but you have to read the whole thing, get attached to them and fall in love with them a little, knowing that at any plot point one or both will be dead.

Cheers, Mr Silvera.

Set in a world like ours, except through an unknown development, it becomes known, at midnight, who in the world is going to die that day.

As you would expect industries develop around the knowledge. It’s a call centre, Death-Cast, that calls you – as soon as they can – so you want to be at the front of that queue. Experience centres and theme parks with global cultures pop up, allowing you to do bucket list things and ‘travel’ before you die.

And people create and hold their own funerals with their loved ones. But what if your loved ones aren’t around or can’t get to you? There’s an app for that. Last Friend.

A little after midnight, Death-Cast calls Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio to give them some bad news: they’re going to die today. Mateo and Rufus are total strangers, but, for different super sad reasons, they’re both looking to make a new friend on their End Day. Rufus and Mateo are about to meet up for one last great adventure – to live a lifetime in a single day.

Neither character is wholly likeable and their flaws are what make them people that you’re rooting for – Rufus a guy that can’t catch a break and to whom rubbish things happen, and Mateo, someone who life is just waiting for, but he just can’t get out and live his life.

To see what these two characters do for their last day is heart breaking, heart warming, and heart to bear (scuse the terrible pun). The constant threat and jolts of ‘this  is how Mateo dies, or Rufus, WATCH OUT’ make this a tense experience.

The world is thought out well, and the details of how Death-Casts would change our society are dead on.

I devoured this in as few sittings as possible as it was uplifting, yet depressing, long but frustratingly short and simple yet deceptively emotional.

Read it. But don’t blame us for making you sad.